Linux .NET Development in 2019

What you need to know

I’ve recently been building .NET Core back-end services that run on Linux. Linux .NET development is in an interesting place; it’s clearly the future of back-end .NET, but it’s still a little rough around the edges compared to our old friend .NET-on-Windows.

Let’s dive into what you (an experienced Windows .NET developer or a .NET-curious Linux developer) need to know to start building .NET services for Linux. I’ll cover IDEs, service hosting, Linux system calls and more.

Every now and then, I wonder “Is low-level programming still unpleasant?” Call it a morbid fascination, but I really did enjoy some aspects of working in C and C++; in particular, reasoning about low-level behaviour becomes a lot easier with fewer layers of abstraction on top of the metal. On the other hand: memory management and interoperability are hard, the C/C++ ecosystems have accumulated decades of cruft, and both languages are missing a lot of features that are now par for the course.

It turns out that the short answer is “No, because Rust is great”, but it’s still useful to get a feel for modern C and C++. Here are some projects and tools that I’ve found particularly indispensable for that.

New Project: ETL Sheets

Experiments with spreadsheet-inspired UI

I recently started experimenting with building tooling for ETL systems. After many years of wrestling with ETL in industry, I had a few questions on my mind:

I think the answer to both questions is yes, but don’t take my word for it – you can try the prototype at etlsheets.netlify.com, and view the source code on GitHub.

Managing Postgres with Pulumi and Terraform

Adventures with Infrastructure as Code

I’m a big fan of Pulumi, and I’ve previously used it for cloud infrastructure. That’s their main selling point; Pulumi’s slogan is literally “Program the cloud.” Interestingly, Pulumi can also be used to manage on-premise infrastructure, including PostgreSQL databases. Let’s dive into the details.

Pulumi takes a declarative infrastructure definition and handles provisioning said infrastructure, just like Terraform, AWS CloudFormation, and Azure Resource Manager. The main difference is that in Pulumi you’re writing real code (Node, Python, or Go) to build that infrastructure definition instead of a YAML or JSON file, it’s great.

Future Imperfect 2.0

A near-complete website rewrite

I spent a few weeks in August rewriting this website, and as promised here are the deets. The source code is available here under the MIT license.

When I initially put this website together in January 2018, I used Julio Pescador’s Hugo port of the Future Imperfect theme. I’d heard good things about Hugo, I wanted to write blog posts in Markdown, and it was a good-looking theme that required minimal additional setup. It served me well for over a year, but a few things kept bothering me:

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About

I'm a software engineer in Vancouver, Canada. I'm interested in databases, urban planning, computing history, and whatever else catches my fancy.

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