Category: Web

Future Imperfect 2.0

A near-complete website rewrite

I spent a few weeks in August rewriting this website, and as promised here are the deets. The source code is available here under the MIT license.

When I initially put this website together in January 2018, I used Julio Pescador’s Hugo port of the Future Imperfect theme. I’d heard good things about Hugo, I wanted to write blog posts in Markdown, and it was a good-looking theme that required minimal additional setup. It served me well for over a year, but a few things kept bothering me:

UI components: Angular vs React

Please don't reinvent JavaScript in your web framework

I’ve been building web UIs in Angular and React for the last few years, and I’ve started to greatly prefer React. Extracting and using UI components is just easier and, for lack of a better word, more JavaScripty.

Say I notice that I’m creating multiple <span> elements with the same class and icon:

Dark Mode on the Web

Using the prefers-color-scheme media selector

I recently rewrote most of this website (more on that soon!) and it’s now much easier to work on. Last week, I shipped a feature that I really like: dark mode using the new prefers-color-scheme media query. If you have dark mode enabled in your OS and a reasonably new browser, reillywood.com now shows you a dark UI using the Solarized colour scheme:

This is really easy to enable, and I hope more sites start using it soon. Under the hood, it’s just a straightforward media query in CSS:

Tailwind CSS

Web styles designed from scratch

I recently overhauled the UI for my letter builder web app, switching from Bootstrap to a neat framework named Tailwind CSS. It’s been great so far.

I dabble in web development, but it’s not “my thing”. Most of my time is spent on back-end systems and the occasional native UI. When I’m building a web UI, I usually spend a lot of time on MDN or W3Schools looking up syntax details.

I recently built a web tool to solve a simple question that comes up often in urban planning: after taking setback requirements into account, how much of lot can be built on? The answer is often surprising: for example, Vancouver’s most common residential zone only allows houses to cover about 28% of the land.

It was a fun weekend project, and a few weeks later I decided to upgrade it on a long plane ride. It’s now a neighbourhood-level simulator with many more parameters:

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Cities & Code

Things that don't quite fit in 280 characters.

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About

I'm a software engineer in Vancouver, Canada. I'm interested in databases, urban planning, computing history, and whatever else catches my fancy.

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