Nushell

Nushell v0.60 is out, and it’s fantastic. This is the first Nu release where I made meaningful contributions (mostly to the website+documentation) and it feels like a good use of my sabbatical time. It’s been interesting figuring out how to sell+explain Nu succinctly; writing good public-facing documentation is hard!

If you haven’t tried Nu, this is a great time to do so; Nu’s not stable yet, but I think you’ll be very pleasantly surprised by the level of polish. I’ve finally made it my default shell on both Windows+Linux.

Most of the work I’m doing for Nushell has a selfish motivation: I want to live in a world where POSIX shells are a thing of the past, and Nushell seems like the most promising way to get there.

Learning

I’ve started working through Crafting Interpreters by Bob Nystrom. My first exposure to Nystrom’s work was Game Programming Patterns, one of the best programming books I’ve ever read. The title’s a little unfortunate because it covers design patterns that are useful in any field of programming; I genuinely think GPP is much more useful to today’s programmer than the book that inspired it.

Crafting Interpreters walks you through building a scripting language from the ground up. The book walks you through an interpreter implementation in Java then C; I’m doing the Java version in C# (personal preference and experience).

Other

I’ve started rekindling some old friendships with people I haven’t seen in person in 2 years, and that’s been really great.

Spring is finally arriving here in Vancouver, so I’ve been finding lots of excuses to be outdoors. My patio’s never been cleaner and I’m looking forward to a lot of spring gardening. I’d like to get some more trellises set up this year; I have a fairly small urban patio so it’s important to make good use of vertical space. “Green to the eye, not green on the ground.”

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About

I'm a programmer in Vancouver, Canada. I'm interested in databases, urban planning, computing history, and whatever else catches my fancy.

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