Category: Software

Quick T-SQL Regression Testing

Using CHECKSUM() and CHECKSUM_AGG()

Here’s something I’ve found useful in SQL Server, but it should apply in any DBMS with checksum functions. Next time you’re refactoring some database objects and you want to do some regression testing, give the CHECKSUM (MSDN) and CHECKSUM_AGG (MSDN) functions a try.

They behave pretty much as you would expect; CHECKSUM returns 1 checksum given 1 row, and CHECKSUM_AGG is an aggregate function that returns 1 checksum given multiple checksum rows. Between the two of them, you can get a checksum for any arbitrary collection of data:

Tailwind CSS

Web styles designed from scratch

I recently overhauled the UI for my letter builder web app, switching from Bootstrap to a neat framework named Tailwind CSS. It’s been great so far.

I dabble in web development, but it’s not “my thing”. Most of my time is spent on back-end systems and the occasional native UI. When I’m building a web UI, I usually spend a lot of time on MDN or W3Schools looking up syntax details.

Pulumi for Cloud Infrastructure Management

IaC, but for real this time

I’ve recently been playing around with some cloud development tooling by a startup named Pulumi, and I thought I’d write up my first impressions.

Pulumi can be summed up as “Infrastructure as Code – but really, we mean it this time.” Instead of mucking around with YAML files and proprietary syntax, you define the infrastructure you need in actual code (JavaScript or Python, with more languages coming later). Is your production environment slightly different from your test environment? No problem, that’s just an if statement (or a more complex abstraction) away.

The State of Serverless

Almost, but not quite there yet

In my spare time I have been mucking around with 2 big Functions-as-a-Service (FaaS) offerings, AWS Lambda and Azure Functions. I’ve been meaning to write up a “The state of serverless development” post, but today Mike Roberts updated his overview of the market for serverless computing and it’s far more thorough than I could ever be.

The whole thing is well worth a read if you’re interested in the area, but these parts (emphasis mine) really resonated with me:

I recently built a web tool to solve a simple question that comes up often in urban planning: after taking setback requirements into account, how much of lot can be built on? The answer is often surprising: for example, Vancouver’s most common residential zone only allows houses to cover about 28% of the land.

It was a fun weekend project, and a few weeks later I decided to upgrade it on a long plane ride. It’s now a neighbourhood-level simulator with many more parameters:

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Cities & Code

Things that don't quite fit in 280 characters.

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I'm a software engineer in Vancouver, Canada. I'm interested in databases, urban planning, computing history, and whatever else catches my fancy.

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