Category: Visual Studio

Bret Victor’s talk Inventing on Principle (video, transcript) changed the way I think about computing in 2019. Inventing on Principle is partly about Bret's guiding principle:

Creators need an immediate connection to what they create. And what I mean by that is when you're making something, if you make a change, or you make a decision, you need to see the effect of that immediately.”

The Edit-Compile-Run Cycle

Although Bret doesn’t use the term, programmers are deeply familiar with his principle. We’ve all worked with toolchains that introduce significant delay before you can “see” the results of a change, and we know they’re painful. Everyone wants a short edit-compile-run cycle.

But until IoP, I’d assumed that slow cycles wouldn’t materially change the output – you'd eventually get to the same place. This was wrong. I also didn’t appreciate the very small time scales involved; a 5 second delay used to seem trivial to me, but it’s still meaningfully different from a response time measured in milliseconds.

Through some very impressive custom tools, Bret shows how immediate feedback enables exploration, which then gives birth to ideas which would otherwise never see the light of day. This was an epiphany for me. Since IoP I’ve constantly been looking for better ways to code, and re-evaluating my existing processes for shorter feedback cycles. The results:

Linux .NET Development in 2019

What you need to know

I've recently been building .NET Core back-end services that run on Linux. Linux .NET development is in an interesting place; it's clearly the future of back-end .NET, but it's still a little rough around the edges compared to our old friend .NET-on-Windows.

Let's dive into what you (an experienced Windows .NET developer or a .NET-curious Linux developer) need to know to start building .NET services for Linux. I'll cover IDEs, service hosting, Linux system calls and more.

Background & Motivation

.NET development for Linux has been possible via Mono since 2004, but it was always a bit… fringe compared to Windows .NET development. That all changed when Microsoft released .NET Core in 2016 as a cross-platform .NET implementation; first-party support from Microsoft is a big deal to most .NET developers.

We're also in a world where Linux is the lingua franca for back-end development; if you want to do anything involving cloud services, distributed systems, or containerization, Windows is typically an afterthought (if it's supported at all). I want to skate to where the puck is going (sorry!), and it's headed toward Linux.

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I'm a software engineer in Vancouver, Canada. I'm interested in databases, urban planning, computing history, and whatever else catches my fancy.

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